Home page for Summerside Promo

SCH student's research to be published in the journal 'Headache'

Congratulations to Marco Goldberg '20, whose concussion research was accepted for poster presentation at the American Headache Society 61st annual scientific meeting and will be published in the journal Headache
 
His abstract on sports-related concussion in high school wrestlers can be found below.

SPORTS-RELATED CONCUSSION IN HIGH SCHOOL WRESTLERS: SURVEY OF WRESTLERS AND THEIR PARENTS.

Goldberg M, Mehallo C, White C, Silberstein S:  Springside Chestnut Hill Academy, Rothman Orthopaedic Institute, Jefferson Headache Center, Philadelphia, PA

Objectives: Concussion is common in contact sports. Concussion evaluation depends on self-reported symptoms and objective measures (balance, oculomotor function, reaction time, and cognitive function). We assessed the experience with, attitude towards, and knowledge of sports-related concussion in high school wrestlers and their parents.  

Methods: A survey was done at a wrestling tournament assessing demographic characteristics, as well as experience with, attitude towards, and knowledge of sports-related concussion. 53 male high school wrestlers and 46 of their parents completed the survey. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square, Fisher’s exact, and t-test methods. Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05.  

Results: 32% of surveyed wrestlers reported having a prior concussion. 47% of previously concussed wrestlers vs. 11% of non-concussed wrestlers considered stopping participation in a contact sport due to concussion concern (p < 0.01).  67% of parents vs. 23% of wrestlers considered stopping participation in a contact sport due to concussion concern (p < 0.001). 49% of wrestlers vs. 7% of parents were willing to conceal a concussion in order to continue participation in athletic activity (p < 0.001). Parents scored higher than wrestlers on concussion knowledge testing. Overall, those with lower knowledge of concussion (< 50% correct) were more likely to conceal a concussion (39% vs. 15%) (p < 0.05).  

Conclusions: Previously concussed wrestlers, all parents, and wrestlers/parents with higher concussion knowledge were most concerned about the risks of sports-related concussion. The finding that 49% of high school wrestlers would conceal a concussion in order to continue participation in athletic activities is concerning.This demonstrates the importance of objective measures of concussion in addition to self-reported symptoms. This highlights the need for continued education of both parents and athletes about the risks of concealing a concussion to continue sports participation.
Back